A Christian response to the gay agenda

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Jon Kennedy’s ‘Postcards from
his soj
ourn in Northern Ireland’

The gay agenda


Jon Kennedy

JONAL ENTRY 1309 | OCTOBER 25 2013

He who is not with me is against me; he who does not gather with me scatters.

— From the Gospel of Luke, chapter 11,
from today’s Orthodox lectionary readings
See the homiletical thought below.

One of the scores of memes generated in a Google image search of “gay agenda.”

Word study: 
The gay agenda

 

Turning from my diary catch-ups to a more philosophical topic, another in a long list of “word studies” that have appeared in this blog since 1998….

 

I’ve been toying with this topic for months, and have finally decided to give it a go. If you “Google” “gay agenda” images, you get thousands of hits, many of which seem to protest that there is no such thing as a gay agenda or imply that it’s a fiction of traditionalists and grumpy old fogies opposed to homosexuals and what they stand for.

But I propose that thoughtful homosexuals and traditionalists alike would agree that it’s never appropriate to speak of people groups as “them” as though their “agendas” or goals or values are uniform or that some group’s “agenda” speaks for any particular individual. This is the same error as the one racism is based on: using generalized stereotypes as though they fit whole racial groups. They never do and should never (in MNSHO) be used that way.

 

But I also submit and defend the proposition that “movements” do have agendas and that, in fact, their agendas define them and often have the power to energize them, and so it is accurate to speak of a gay agenda as the goals and values being promoted by the gay movement. It’s for this reason that I have always (since I was managing editor of the Christian Beacon) advocated that gay and homosexual should not be used as synonyms; “gay” should be reserved to refer to the “movement” and its values, not all homosexuals or people who admit to same-sex attraction (widely called SSAs in recent literature on the general topic). I’ve been a member of a number of movements in my life: especially the “reformation* movement” in my late teens and twenties; the “reformational** movement” in my thirties, the traditionalist movement after being mentored by C.S. Lewis, and others. I would say, too, that Christianity, as Jesus and His disciples defined it, is a movement and that it has certain agendas.

 

Christianity has as its over-riding—one can even call it its defining agenda—the world’s salvation. And by salvation it means changing the world’s course from a secular, worldly, or vulgar (in its most basic meaning) course to a path of righteousness through being adopted in Jesus’ family, one person at a time until every one has been reached, and learning the meaning of righteousness and how to pursue it (imitating and growing more like Him). Some might say this defines “evangelical Christianity,” but every authentic Christian of any denomination or communion believes in this because it is Jesus’ own mandate; none of them pursue it perfecttly because none of the living ones are perfect, but all should be encouraging all the others to keep the course, to finish the race (to use the Apostle Paul’s metaphor).

 

Another meme image generated in a Google image search.

 

If the gay movement has any comparable agenda, by my observations as a resident (and I daresay, as a “professional observer” as a trained journalist) of the San Francisco metro area for over forty years, I would conclude that it is sexualizing the world; making it more accepting of public sexual expressions and displays. That includes the example in the second meme above, but it goes even much farther (for example, San Francisco’s supervisors actually legalized public nudity last year, but later back-pedalled after many residents, including some homosexuals, complained about some of the implications of that—mainly, some objected to sitting on public benches that naked people had used). Sexualizing the world includes teaching in the public schools that same-sex “marriage” is a legitimate choice for those desiring it even starting as early as kindergarten. Sexualizing the world has already virtually won the fight for legalizing sodomy through “gay marriage.” It is also demonstrated by widespread use of abortion as birth control and in the Obamacare mandate (the “contraceptive mandate”) that all health insurance programs, even those of church agencies that disapprove of sex outside of traditional marriage, provide abortion services and contraceptives to all of their members. And some court cases in Europe and Canada have already foreshadowed that criticizing gay lifestyles and practices will be illegal (as “hate crimes”) and that blessing such unions will be made mandatory, eventually, in all state-recognized or -sanctioned churches in all liberal-democratic societies.

 

The gay movement is not the only or even the first social movement to make sexualizing society a goal; feminism, in its crusade for equal sexual freedom for women, has probably influenced the gay movement more than the other way around and it has carried the abortion cause. Playboy and Cosmopolitan magazines have long openly espoused public sexualization, and the Fox, ABC, CBS, and NBC networks have done so less openly but no less relentlessly.

 

This agenda is why I disagree with one of my colleague writers (and whose work, in general, I highly esteem) in the Orthodox world who feels that Christians making an issue of “gay marriage” are on the wrong track because such opposition could undermine the evangelizing of gays, who need salvation and the therapy offered by the church no less than anyone else. That point is well taken, but the truth often hurts, and the damage to society by greater and greater acceptance of social sexualization is detrimental to all, including gays, whether they know it, or care, or not.

_______________
*The Reformation or 20th Century Reformation movement was an anti-Communist (and by extension, anti-liberal) crusade founded and controlled by Presbyterian minister Dr. Carl McIntire, late of Collingswood, New Jersey.

 

**The Reformational movement is an academic and intellectual movement based in biblical philosophy founded in the Netherlands in the 19th and 20th centuries by Groen van Prinsterer, Abraham Kuyper, Herman Dooyeweerd, and D. H. Th. Vollenhoven.

 

Please leave comments on my comments page.

 

§ I have now uploaded over 2,000 photos and videos, mostly from my current visit to Northern Ireland, but also including several hundred photos and videos from my summer in Pennsylvania (2012), and some photos of the family, on my Flickr site. Most of these are now organized by sets. Click here for the Flicker site.

For more and more spontaneous posts, follow me onand. Google+ is much easier to understand, so most of the pictures I post are posted there.

 

Feedback: You can comment on today’s topic on the page linked here:

COMMENTS Feedback is always welcome.

Homiletical thought: The lectionary reading of the day a few days back recounted the disciples telling Jesus they had rebuked a “non-follower” for trying to oppose evil in His name. But Jesus disapproved of this, telling them that those who are not against Him are for Him. So why the apparent contradiction in today’s lesson? The qualification is that those who are coming to Him for help in their opposition to evil are on the right track but those who are claiming to be able to oppose evil in their own strength, even if they throw out His name to gain attention, are fooling themselves and trying to deceive those they are claiming to help. Those coming toward the Lord are going in the right direction; those who are going away from Him are misled and misleading. As in so many other situations, it comes down to those who are coming from a humble spirit over against those who are operating out of their pride. And all of us are in danger of falling into such self-deceit, what the Russian spiritual fathers call “prelest.”

§     §     §

Please pray for my mission to Northern Ireland. You can read my background overview of this undertaking here. My residence/postal address is 227 Crumlin Road, Belfast, Northern Ireland BT14 7DY, UK. Mobile: 44 7455 980890.

— Webmaster Jon Kennedy

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Jon R. Kennedy, C. S. Lewis Writer in Residence
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Too much to recapitulate

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Jon Kennedy’s ‘Postcards from
his soj
ourn in Northern Ireland
Too much to recapitulate


Jon Kennedy

JONAL ENTRY 1308 | OCTOBER 2 2013

The saying is sure and worthy of full acceptance, that Christ Jesus came into the world to save sinners. And I am the foremost of sinners; but I received mercy for this reason, that in me, as the foremost, Jesus Christ might display his perfect patience for an example to those who were to believe in him for eternal life.

— from Paul’s First Epistle to Timothy, chapter 1

The Lord said, “Why do you call me ‘Lord, Lord,’ and not do what I tell you?”

From the Gospel of Luke, chapter 6, from today’s
Orthodox lectionary readings
See the homiletical thought below.

Diary: General catch-up

It’s been three weeks since I last wrote, and too much has happened to even try to recap it all. I can’t believe I’ve become a big user of Facebook, but it has come to pass. It takes far less time to update my status there and see what a wide assortment of friends and family members (including my two little grand-daughters) have been up to without having to sit down to write. I’d rather be writing—that’s my bumper sticker—but usually that’s not practical and often I’m too distracted to collect my thoughts.

So here are the main highlights of my past three weeks. I began, three weeks ago yesterday, volunteering for one four-hour shift per week at the Dock Cafe. Though I was already too busy, it seemed I wasn’t doing enough pure ministering, and this—washing dishes, cleaning tables, and serving customers, is about as focused as you can get in actually ministering to people (short of nursing or surgery, neither of which I’ve shown any aptitude for). The Dock Cafe is a cross-community (Protestant-Catholic and Orthodox) ministry, which is the type of work I came here to do. Most of its clients this time of year and on the day and time I’m working (roughly 11-3 Tuesdays) are students in the nearby community college, Belfast Met, so I’m at least saying hello and “how can I help you” to more students in these four hours than I did in a typical week in my campus ministry years at Stanford. Literally, hundreds of them spend time in the cafe through those hours. I’ve described some aspects of the Dock Cafe in these blogs so I won’t revisit the generalitites, but to add that its food and beverages are provided without price; partakers are asked to put a contribution to help out in the “honesty box,” but no one tracks any individual. There are some “pay what you can” cafes in the United States (mostly as ministry to homeless and otherwise needy) but this may be the only one in Ireland or the UK.

On Sunday, September 22, I represented the Orthodox Church here at Queen’s University, the major campus in Belfast. It was the beginning of term, and the Uni was welcoming parents who were dropping off their freshmen or, as they call them here, “freshers.” I had invitations to visit St. Ignatius Orthodox Church, and though few showed interest, it was great to fellowship with campus ministers from the Church of Ireland, Methodist, Catholic, Presbyterian, and Congregational traditions.

Since my schedule has become more crowded with the addition of the shift at the Cafe, I’ve decided to set aside Wednesdays and Fridays as my travel days, and I’ve had three awesome trips since my report on Coleraine last time. On September 20 I went to Downpatrick, which is only a few miles (around 20, I believe) southeast of Belfast, in the same direction but not the same highway as New Castle. It is the site where St. Patrick is believed to have entered Ireland in the Fourth Century and his remains along with those of Ireland’s two other patron saints, Colm (Columba) and Bridgit, are believed to be interred in the cathedral grounds there. I had been there with my sons years ago, so had not made it a top priority after arriving this time. But being able to explore without having to hurry to see other sites the same day was wonderful. See the photos and notes on my Downpatrick day on my Google+ page.

Last Wednesday I made my second trip to Dublin since moving here last March, and it was also very fruitful, as the pictures and notes on Google+ attest. And since there were schedule conflicts last Friday, I didn’t travel that day but opted to go to Bangor on Saturday, and that was, as they say here, brilliant. Literally; it was one of the best days in terms of weather in my six and a half months here. And though I had been in Bangor once on an earlier visit, I hadn’t really seen the town and was dazzled by its beauty as an ancient seaport. Again, there are several “albums” of pictures taken that day on Google+.

I’m now holding the fort alone at the Loom while Ward and Marda (my landlords/housemates) are on holiday for almost two weeks. Today is a travel day, but the mist is what most of the world calls rain and since I’m so behind on blogging, I’m here at the Cafe Wah doing my duty rather than gallivantin’.

Please leave comments. Finally, below are some of the best picture previews of my recent travels, if you haven’t been keeping up on Google+.

St. Patrick’s Cathedral in Downpatrick

Fall in St. Stephen’s Green, Dublin

Bangor, Ireland, makes me think of Cape Cod, an idyllic seashore town with a harbor, a marina (above), restaurants with ocean views, and views of church steeples inland.

§ I have now uploaded over 2,000 photos and videos, mostly from my current visit to Northern Ireland, but also including several hundred photos and videos from my summer in Pennsylvania (2012), and some photos of the family, on my Flickr site. Most of these are now organized by sets. Click here for the Flicker site.

For more and more spontaneous posts, follow me onand. Google+ is much easier to understand, so most of the pictures I post are posted there.

Feedback: You can comment on today’s topic on the page linked below

Feedback is always welcome.

Homiletical thought: What a short and sweet presentation of the Gospel is Paul’s opening greeting to Timothy, that all are sinners and are saved only by God’s grace through the work of Jesus Christ. And how tragic that Jesus’ words from this passage from Luke is as true now as when He said it. Also worth some thought is Paul’s emphasis on the importance of being, and having, godly examples.

§     §     §

Please pray for my mission to Northern Ireland. You can read my background overview of this undertaking here. My residence/postal address is 227 Crumlin Road, Belfast, Northern Ireland BT14 7DY, UK. Mobile: 44 7455 980890.

— Webmaster Jon Kennedy

Coleraine and Mountsandel Woods and Fort

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Jon Kennedy’s ‘Postcards from
his soj
ourn in Northern Ireland’
 
Coleraine and Mountsandel 
Woods and Fort
 
JONAL ENTRY 1307 | SEPTEMBER 7 2013
 
. . . we do impart wisdom, although it is not a wisdom of this age or of the rulers of this age, who are doomed to pass away. But we impart a secret and hidden wisdom of God, which God decreed before the ages for our glorification.
 
— from Paul’s First Epistle to the
Church in Corinth, chapter 2, from today’s
Orthodox lectionary readings
See the homiletical thought below.
 
Diary: Another Ulster adventure
 
Thursday, September 5 — Got my blog (mostly yesterday’s diary entry) online and sent to my list today, along with Jim Toth’s latest blog.
 
We went to Townsend/Charis Bible College to see two films about Noah and the Ark that were shown by Jack last night.
 
Marda’s company from Los Angeles arrived and they took off to tour the north coast this morning.
 
Friday, September 6 11:30 a.m. — I’m on a train to Coleraine for today’s adventure.
 
I arrived in Coleraine around 12:50. At first I couldn’t see the town center and began walking away from it. But realizing I was going in the wrong direction, I made a U-turn.
 
In a couple of blocks I found a large pedestrian mall and looked for a place to get lunch. On the way, I found the St. Patrick’s Church of Ireland and went inside to have a look. An organist was playing and I was able to record his rendition of St. Patrick’s hymn, “Be Thou My Vision.” I have started carrying with me my HTC Android phone to use for videos like this, as my new Samsung camera makes such large video files that they are hard (time consuming) to process or even put on YouTube. There was a very nice older man, Cecil, and yes even older than me, at the information table. We had a nice talk. I also got good photos (on my Samsung) of the church and the mall.
 
 
This St. Patrick’s of Coleraine, adjacent to the downtown mall.
 
Coleraine is a nice town of 25,000 residents and boasts the highest property values in Northern Ireland. I spotted a tourism information office and got a map and a free booklet and asked about Mountsandel Fort, a mound dating from Norman days which I had read about online on the train up. Adjacent to it is the site of a dig that produced artifacts from Ireland’s oldest prehistoric (stone-age) settlement ever found.
 
 
Coleraine Town Hall is a landmark at the end of the pedestrian mall.
 
Finding my way to the River Baan, by way of the Town Hall, which is historic and photogenic, I crossed the river and discovered on the opposite side an old Courthouse which is now a pub/restaurant, and which was advertising the best prices I’d seen today, so I went in there for lunch: roast of the day (chicken), mashed with gravy, broccoli, and carrots. All this plus a very good large capuccino for £4.70! Even a better price than in Cookstown.
 
Though the weather app had been predicting a rainy day, there was still lots of sunshine (though the breezes were a bit nippy with just my wind breaker on) when I recrossed the river to make my way to Mountsandel Forest and the historic fort.
 
 
A panorama view of the River Baan in Coleraine. Downtown
is in the background. Google+ automatically stitches
five photos together to create panoramas like this.
 
The dot that the lady in the tourist office had put on my map to mark the fort proved to be incorrect, but I asked a man walking along and he kindly put me on the right path.
 
 
Mountsandel Fort. The ‘fort’ is the dirt mound that rises
50 feet or more from the river valley floor below.
 
The walk in the woods was longer than expected, but the payoff was worth it: lots of good photos and videos of some very photogenic sights (check all of them out in the Coleraine set in my Flickr site). When I got back to the street, the sky was quite dark with rain clouds. I walked to the nearest bus stop (with no shelter) and waited, probably a half an hour, and sure enough it started to rain. I wrapped my cap in a plastic bag I’ve been carrying since the stores began charging (under an “environmental” law) for bags. My cap fared the rain well and kept my head dry; the rest of me got soaked. But after about ten minutes in the rain, the worst I’ve been caught out in, a bus came. It took me directly to the train/bus station, and I am now writing this on the train which is approaching my Belfast station, Yorkgate.
 
§ I have now uploaded over 1,000 photos, mostly from my current visit to Northern Ireland, but also including several hundred photos from my summer in Pennsylvania (2012), and some photos of the family, on my Flickr site. Though not individually labeled, most of these are now organized by sets. If you’re interested, click here for the Flicker site.
 
For more and more spontaneous posts, follow me onand. Google+ is much easier to understand, so most of the pictures I post are posted there.
 
Feedback is always welcome.
 
Homiletical thought: Things look dark and are likely to get darker (remember Nero and Caligulua, the days of Noah and Sodom). But the Apostle assures us the rulers of this age and their wars against faith, morality, believers, and the Church will fade away and be forgotten when the faithful shine in Glory.
 
§     §     §
 
Please pray for my mission to Northern Ireland. You can read my background overview of this undertaking here. My residence/postal address is 227 Crumlin Road, Belfast, Northern Ireland BT14 7DY, UK. Mobile: 44 7455 980890.

Cookstown, because it’s there

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Jon Kennedy’s ‘Postcards from
his soj
ourn in Northern Ireland’


Jon Kennedy  

JONAL ENTRY 13066 | SEPTEMBER 5 2013

 

. . . We have renounced disgraceful, underhanded ways; we refuse to practice cunning or to tamper with God’s word, but by the open statement of truth we commend ourselves to every man’s conscience in the sight of God.

 

— from Paul’s Second Epistle to the
Church in Corinth, chapter 4, from today’s
Orthodox lectionary readings
See the homiletical thought below.

Diary: An even less real castle, in the woods

 

September 4  Wednesday, writing on a bus from Europa Bus Center to Dungannon, en route to Cookstown. Cookstown is one of the largest towns in Ulster that I have not visited, so that is why that’s where I’m bound today.

 

Marda and Ward are expecting visitors from the United States today, to be in Ireland till Monday. Marda will take them north tomorrow for some touring; since there are four of them that’s a car full so Ward will stay home, in the aegis of Derek.

 

Today is mostly sunny; thus far, September has been better than August was.

 

Now writing from Dungannon, while waiting for the bus to Cookstown.

 

John Grant, “the Kiwi,” blew back into Belfast last week and stayed with us most of the time. He has spent a year bicycling all over Ireland and, at 62, he has the physique of a 30-year old. I spent Monday afternoon with him; he’s a great friend of all. He left yesterday with a friend from near Sligo, and will fly out of Dublin back to New Zealand on Sunday, so we don’t expect to see him again on this trip and of course when a trip is that long, we wonder if he’ll ever make it this way again.

 

We got to talking about snakes, and he informed me that like Ireland, New Zealand has no snakes, in contrast to its bigger neighbor, Australia, which has many species, including some of the world’s most venomous. I never had interest in visiting New Zealand, but now I’m more interested.

 

Cookstown is spread out, boasts the widest and longest main boulevard in Ireland, and I walked most of the length of it and on out into the countryside to walk the footpath to the “Cabin Wood,” a trail reminiscent of the Ghost Town Trail outside my home town of Nanty Glo, PA, toward Twin Rocks, with a small river on the left. I saw no cabin along the path, but there was a castle on the hill across the river from the path, though getting to a place where it could be photographed took some doing.

 

 

Above is a picture of the main street (the name of which is several different things along its length, none of them “Main Street”). And below is the best photo I got of the castle: It does not have an ancient history as a castle-fort, as “authentic” or “historic” castles do, being only about two centuries old and still lived-in by a family who acquired it in the early 20th century for £100.

 

 

I waited to get to Cookstown before having lunch, and that was a good move, as I found a “carvery-pub” that had three-course lunches for £5. Here’s what I had: meat, potatoes, and assorted vegetables, all tasty and of good quality; classical Irish fare but seldom found (at least on my budget) in Belfast.

 

 

The most interesting buildings in town were three churches along the main boulevard: The Methodist Church, below left, which looks historic but is described in an account of Cookstown only as “Romanesque” in its architectural style. Likewise, the Roman Catholic Church, Holy Trinity, below right, is of 19th-century construction.

 

 

And so is St. Lurgan’s Church of Ireland, below.

 

 

§ I have now uploaded over 1,000 photos, mostly from my current visit to Northern Ireland, but also including several hundred photos from my summer in Pennsylvania (2012), and some photos of the family, on my Flickr site. Though not individually labeled, most of these are now organized by sets. If you’re interested, click here for the Flicker site.

 

For more and more spontaneous posts, follow me onand. Google+ is much easier to understand, so most of the pictures I post are posted there.

Feedback is always welcome.

 

Homiletical thought: Paul reminds the Corinthians, and us, of some of God’s expectations for the behavior of His people.

§     §     §

Please pray for my mission to Northern Ireland. You can read my overview of this undertaking here. My residence/postal address is 227 Crumlin Road, Belfast, Northern Ireland BT14 7DY, UK. Mobile: 44 7455 980890.

— Webmaster Jon Kennedy

The hurrieder I go, the behinder I get

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Jon Kennedy’s ‘Postcards from
his soj
ourn in Northern Ireland’
The hurrieder I go, the behinder I get


Jon Kennedy

JONAL ENTRY 1305 | AUGUST 26 2013

. . . you have need of endurance, so that you may do the will of God and receive what is promised.

— from the Epistle to the
Hebrews, chapter 10, from today’s
Orthodox lectionary readings
See the homiletical thought below.

Diary: A real castle (if Disneyland gets to define ‘real’)

[My apologies, the italic type that shows up on most of the page does NOT show up at the editing level, so there’s no way to correct it. To see the proper formatting, go to the permanent version: http://www.nantyglo.com/2013JK/aug26.htm.]

August 23—It’s Friday so I’m off on another adventure; on a bus leaving Belfast’s Europa bus terminal for Newry. Newry is a large town/small city on the way to Dublin which I’ve been in only on buses and a train (and yes, the Pennsylvania Newry in Blair County was named after it). My plan is to go from there to Killkeel, the coastal town on the far side of the Mourne mountains from New Castle, as described here earlier. My barista recommended this, so it’s time, though I’m way behind on my work. I have just determined that both Newry and Kilkeel are in Northern Ireland, not across the border as I thought they might be.

Ironically, I rushed through all of last week’s diary except for Saturday and Sunday in Monday’s post, so I could get to the best part of the week, Saturday and Sunday, another day or so later. That’s ironic because I never got back to that diary update and now I’m adding another adventure to the queue and have no hope for ever recapping this week. So with no more delay:

Saturday, August 17

Ethel White, our friend from many contacts and contexts including the Dock Walks, invited us to meet her and a couple of her friends—Beth and Sheila—at the Ulster Museum while they looked at our puppet exhibition, Whispering Belfast, and another exhibit, which we did. Then Sheila, who works as a volunteer at the East Belfast Mission, suggested we all go to Skainos, the headquarters building of the EBM, for lunch, which we all did. During lunch I mentioned that I do bus and train excursions each week, which may have given Ethel the idea for an excursion to a couple of County Down sites she wanted to show us, and we all (except for Ward, who preferred to work on his poems), were up for that.

While we were eating at Skainos, an officer of the EBM, there with his wife, recognized Sheila and came over to our table to chat for a few minutes. Ethel introduced him and his wife to Beth, who is a missionary in Indonesia, home on furlough, and since Beth and I were sharing a booth, he assumed I was Beth’s husband, which brought some laughs and became a subtext for banter and jokes for the rest of the afternoon.

The sites Ethel wanted to take us to were a small island, Sketrick next to the village of Whiterock, which has the ruin of an ancient castle-fort, and it is accessed only via a causeway that gets flooded in high tide, and the town of Killyleagh (killy lee), which has the best preserved and most picturesque medieval castle I’ve ever seen; you could call it Disneyesque. We only drove in and out of the island beyond the causeway, without getting out of the car (maybe the tide was coming in?) but spent an hour or two in Killyleagh, which also has a very nice coffee shop/bakery where the ladies sat and chatted while I went on a photo safari. That turned out to be the highlight of last weekend. Below are three of the photos from Killyleagh.

Business fronts in historic Killyleagh are painted in the bold colors that many Irish homes and businesses are famous for. Killyleagh is on the western shore of Strangford Lough, the large inlet into Northern Ireland from the Irish sea that is believed to have given St. Patrick access to the island in the fifth century.

A view of Killyleagh Castle through the front gates. Visitors are not permitted to go inside the grounds beyond this point, as the castle is still occupied by members of its longtime owners family, Hamiltons. The temporary buildings are part of a filming project going on inside the castle, where it is being used as a set in a BBC series. The site is thought to be one of the most used locations for filming in the UK..

The castle as seen from the carpark (parking lot) at the Presbyterian Church at the foot of the hill. On the right the gatehouse is seen. The Presbyterian Church was traditionally the church of the Hamilton family.

Monday, August 26

Two Sundays have passed since the Saturday visit at Killyleagh, so I have given up trying to “catch up.”

I have now uploaded over 1,000 photos, mostly from my current visit to Northern Ireland, but also including many from my summer in Pennsylvania (2012), and a few photos of the family, at my Flickr site. At this writing, most of these are not organized or labeled. I hope to undertake organizing them at least into albums as time allows, so they may appear differently from one visit to the next. If you’re interested, click here for the Flicker site.

For more and more spontaneous posts, follow me onand. Google+ is much easier to understand, so most of the pictures I post are posted there.

Feedback: You can comment on today’s topic on the page linked here:

COMMENTS

Feedback is always welcome.

Homiletical thought: God has not promised a life of comfort or ease, but has called us to endure and promises to help us do so. Most of the apostles, along with thousands other believers of the church’s first three centuries, suffered martyrdom. The prize is to the runner who finishes the course, but the good news is that there is a prize—life eternal—for all who cross the finish line.

§     §     §

Please pray for my mission to Northern Ireland. You can read my overview of this undertaking here. My residence/postal address is 227 Crumlin Road, Belfast, Northern Ireland BT14 7DY, UK. Mobile: 44 7455 980890.

— Webmaster Jon Kennedy

Highlights of last week

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Jon Kennedy’s ‘Postcards from
his soj
ourn in Northern Ireland’
Highlights of last week


Jon Kennedy

JONAL ENTRY 1304 | AUGUST 19 2013

“Whoever receives one such child in my name receives me; but whoever causes one of these little ones who believe in me to sin, it would be better for him to have a great millstone fastened round his neck and to be drowned in the depth of the sea. Woe to the world for temptations to sin! For it is necessary that temptations come, but woe to the man by whom the temptation comes!”

— from the Gospel of
Matthew chapter 18, from today’s
Orthodox lectionary readings
See the homiletical thought below.

Diary: A recap of most of last week

This time I’ll recap much of a typical week’s routine, but will try to avoid being so repetitive and giving so much detail of the minutiae in future diary posts.

Please click here to continue reading

http://www.nantyglo.com/2013JK/aug19.htm

Life is a riot

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Jon Kennedy’s ‘Postcards from
his soj
ourn in Northern Ireland’
 
Life is a riot
 
JONAL ENTRY 1303 | AUGUST 10 2013
 
Do not be conformed to this world but be transformed by the renewal of your mind, that you may prove what is the will of God, what is good and acceptable and perfect.
— from Paul’s Epistle to the 
Romans chapter 12, from today’s
Orthodox lectionary readings
See the homiletical thought below.
Diary: Updates from the past three days
 
Thursday, August 8
 
No tea time this morning, so I went to Cafe Wah to do a blog entry, which became the day’s main accomplishment. . . .